Rehab

ace health centre new gym space

New Gym Space

New Gym Space 1920 2560 Ace Health Centre

New Gym Space

We upgraded our clinic!

We are thrilled to share some exciting news with you – While everybody was busy enjoying their Christmas and New Year. Mike, Amelia and Grant were busy playing builders, and we now have a new gym space ready for you!

Understanding the importance of a holistic approach to rehabilitation and overall well-being, we have invested in creating a state-of-the-art gym space within our clinic. This new facility is designed to complement your physiotherapy sessions and provide you with the tools and environment to enhance your strength, flexibility, and overall fitness.

Key features of our new gym area:

Top-of-the-line exercise equipment

Our new gym area is equipped with state-of-the-art exercise machines and tools specially curated to support your physiotherapy sessions. From resistance training to cardiovascular exercises, we’ve got it all covered. Each piece of equipment has been selected to aid in your rehabilitation and help you regain strength and flexibility.

Dedicated space for guided exercises and rehabilitation

Our new gym area is a testament to our commitment to a holistic approach to rehabilitation. Physical therapy isn’t just about treating symptoms – it’s about addressing the root causes of discomfort and fostering long-term well-being. The integration of the gym into our clinic allows us to provide comprehensive care that goes beyond the treatment room.

Expert supervision from our qualified physiotherapists

You won’t be on your own in the gym. Our team of expert physiotherapists will be right there with you, providing guidance, support, and motivation. They will ensure that you perform each exercise with proper form and technique, maximizing the benefits of your workout while minimizing the risk of injury.

Tailored fitness programs to meet your individual needs

One size doesn’t fit all, especially when it comes to physiotherapy. Our experienced physiotherapists will create personalized workout plans tailored to your specific needs and goals. Whether you’re recovering from an injury, managing a chronic condition, or aiming to enhance your overall well-being, our new gym area will serve as the perfect space for your customized exercise routine.

Comfortable and motivating atmosphere at our new gym space

We understand that the right environment can significantly impact your rehabilitation journey. That’s why we’ve created a gym space that is not only functional but also comfortable and inviting. Whether you’re a seasoned athlete or new to exercise, our gym area welcomes everyone to embark on their path to recovery and strength.

Pilates classes and equipment in our new gym space

We offer pilates classes daily all run and supervised by your physiotherapist. Did you know that if you have private health you maybe able to claim these sessions depending on your level of cover.

Compression and recovery area

Inflatable compression pants, commonly known as compression therapy pants, are used for various purposes, including in the realm of podiatry. While they are not directly related to foot care, they can be part of an overall recovery strategy for patients with lower limb issues. These pants feature inflatable chambers that can be pressurized, creating a controlled compression effect on the legs. This dynamic compression helps improve blood circulation, reduce swelling, and alleviate discomfort.

The addition of our new gym area marks an exciting chapter in the story of Ace Health Centre. We are dedicated to offering you the best possible care, and our new facility reflects that commitment. We look forward to seeing you make strides in your physiotherapy journey in this dynamic and empowering space.

 

RECOVERY COMPRESSION THERAPY

Pneumatic compression therapy

Pneumatic compression therapy 810 810 Ace Health Centre

Pneumatic compression therapy

Pneumatic compression therapy is a widely recognized and effective method for managing edema and promoting recovery in various medical conditions. Edema, the abnormal accumulation of fluid in body tissues, can result from conditions such as venous insufficiency, lymphedema, or post-surgical swelling. Pneumatic compression therapy, often referred to as pneumatic compression devices (PCDs) or compression pumps, offers a non-invasive and targeted approach to alleviate edema and support the body’s natural healing processes.

What is Pneumatic Compression Therapy?

These devices consist of inflatable sleeves or boots that are worn on the affected limbs. The sleeves are connected to a pump that delivers intermittent compression to the extremities, mimicking the natural muscle contractions that help move fluid through the lymphatic system. The therapy works by enhancing circulation, reducing swelling, and promoting the drainage of excess fluid from the affected area.

What are the benefits?

One of the primary benefits of compression therapy is its ability to improve venous and lymphatic circulation. As the sleeves inflate and deflate, they exert pressure on the tissues, assisting in the movement of blood and lymphatic fluid. This enhanced circulation helps reduce the stagnation of fluid, preventing further swelling and facilitating the removal of waste products from the affected area.

What conditions is pneumatic compression therapy used for?

For individuals dealing with chronic conditions like lymphedema, pneumatic compression therapy is a valuable tool in the management of symptoms. The therapy can be customized to target specific areas, providing a tailored approach to address the unique needs of each patient. By incorporating pneumatic compression into a comprehensive treatment plan, healthcare professionals can help patients regain control over their symptoms and improve their overall quality of life.

Compression therapy is not limited to managing edema; it also plays a crucial role in enhancing post-surgical recovery. After certain surgical procedures, swelling and fluid retention can impede the healing process. PCDs aid in reducing postoperative edema, minimizing discomfort, and promoting faster recovery. This is particularly relevant for patients undergoing orthopedic surgeries or procedures involving the extremities.

In addition to its physical benefits, compression therapy is well-tolerated by patients and can be easily incorporated into daily routines. Many devices are portable, allowing individuals to receive treatment in the comfort of their homes. This convenience enhances compliance with prescribed treatment plans, ensuring that patients receive the full therapeutic benefits of compression therapy.

Conclusion

In conclusion, pneumatic compression therapy stands as a valuable ally in the management of edema and the promotion of recovery. Whether addressing chronic conditions or aiding in post-surgical healing, this non-invasive approach offers a targeted and effective solution. As healthcare professionals continue to explore innovative modalities for improving patient outcomes, pneumatic compression therapy remains a cornerstone in the comprehensive care of individuals dealing with edema and related concerns.

Contact us today to find out more.

Physiotherapy in the offseason

Physiotherapy in the offseason

Physiotherapy in the offseason 1125 1034 Ace Health Centre

Physiotherapy in the offseason

Physiotherapy plays a crucial role in the sport’s offseason, offering athletes a structured period of rehabilitation, recovery, and preparation for the upcoming season.

Here are several key reasons highlighting the importance of physiotherapy during this downtime:

1. **Injury Rehabilitation:** Athletes often carry injuries or nagging conditions from the previous season into the offseason. Physiotherapy provides a dedicated period for comprehensive rehabilitation, ensuring injuries are fully healed and strengthening the affected areas. This sets the foundation for a healthy start to the next season.

2. **Restoration of Function:** Athletes can use the offseason to focus on restoring full functional capacity. Physiotherapists design customized exercise programs to regain strength, mobility, and flexibility, enabling athletes to return to peak performance.

3. **Preventative Care:** The offseason is an ideal time to address underlying issues that may have contributed to injuries during the previous season. Physiotherapists can identify and correct musculoskeletal imbalances, posture problems, or overuse issues to reduce the risk of future injuries.

4. **Conditioning and Strength Training:** Physiotherapists work with athletes to develop strength and conditioning programs tailored to their specific sport. This ensures that athletes build the necessary physical foundation to excel when the competitive season resumes.

5. **Pain Management:** Athletes dealing with chronic pain or discomfort benefit from ongoing pain management strategies during the offseason. Physiotherapy includes modalities such as manual therapy, electrotherapy, and therapeutic exercises to alleviate pain and improve overall comfort.

6. **Recovery from Surgery:** Athletes who underwent surgery during the season can use the offseason for post-operative rehabilitation. Physiotherapists guide them through a structured recovery process, helping them regain strength and function after surgical procedures.

7. **Performance Enhancement:** Athletes and their physiotherapists collaborate to enhance performance. Through specialized exercises, functional assessments, and biomechanical analysis, physiotherapy can improve an athlete’s technique and efficiency, leading to better results on the field.

8. **Mental Health Support:** The offseason can be mentally challenging for athletes, as they transition from intense competition to a less demanding period. Physiotherapists often serve as a source of emotional support and motivation, helping athletes stay positive and focused on their long-term goals.

9. **Education and Injury Prevention:** Physiotherapists educate athletes on injury prevention techniques, proper warm-up and cool-down routines, and effective self-care strategies. This knowledge empowers athletes to take an active role in safeguarding their health and minimizing the risk of injuries.

10. **Return-to-Sport Assessment:** Before athletes transition back into full training and competition, physiotherapists conduct thorough assessments to ensure they are physically ready. These assessments help minimize the risk of re-injury and ensure that athletes are at their best when the season begins.

Conclusion

In conclusion, physiotherapy in the sports offseason is not only important but often essential for athletes’ long-term success and well-being. It offers a strategic period for injury recovery, rehabilitation, strength conditioning, and performance enhancement. By collaborating with physiotherapists, athletes can optimize their physical health and prepare themselves for the rigorous demands of the upcoming competitive season.

Book in with our physio’s today to get your offseason programme.

Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

Lumbar Spinal Stenosis 1200 848 Ace Health Centre

Lumbar Spinal Stenosis and How Physiotherapy Can Help

Lumbar spinal stenosis is a common condition that affects the lower back and causes pain, numbness, and weakness in the legs. It occurs when the spinal canal narrows, putting pressure on the nerves that travel through the lower back. This narrowing is often a result of age-related changes in the spine, such as the thickening of ligaments or the formation of bone spurs.

Living with lumbar spinal stenosis can be challenging, as it can limit one’s mobility and overall quality of life. However, physiotherapy has emerged as a valuable treatment option that can help manage the symptoms and improve functionality for individuals with this condition.

What will physio do to help?

Physiotherapy offers a range of techniques and exercises that specifically target the affected area, providing relief and promoting healing. Here’s how physiotherapy can help individuals with lumbar spinal stenosis:

  1. Pain Management: Physiotherapists are skilled in using various modalities, such as heat or cold therapy, ultrasound, and electrical stimulation, to reduce pain and inflammation. These techniques help alleviate discomfort and improve overall comfort levels.
  2. Strengthening Exercises: Weakness in the muscles supporting the spine can worsen the symptoms of lumbar spinal stenosis. Physiotherapists can design specific exercises that target these muscles, helping to improve their strength and stability. Strengthening the core muscles, including the abdominals and lower back, can provide better support to the spine and reduce stress on the affected area.
  3. Flexibility and Stretching: Tight muscles and inflexible joints can contribute to the narrowing of the spinal canal and increase discomfort. Physiotherapy involves stretching exercises that focus on increasing flexibility in the hip, lower back, and leg muscles. Improved flexibility helps relieve pressure on the nerves and reduces pain.
  4. Posture Correction: Poor posture can exacerbate the symptoms of lumbar spinal stenosis. Physiotherapists can assess a patient’s posture and provide guidance on proper body mechanics. They can recommend modifications to daily activities and exercises that promote optimal posture, reducing strain on the lower back and improving overall spinal alignment.
  5. Education and Lifestyle Modification: Physiotherapists play a vital role in educating individuals about lumbar spinal stenosis and its management. They can provide guidance on proper body mechanics during activities of daily living, as well as recommend assistive devices like braces or walking aids when necessary. Furthermore, they can suggest lifestyle modifications, such as weight management and regular exercise, to alleviate symptoms and improve long-term outcomes.

Conclusion

Physiotherapy offers a holistic approach to the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis. It focuses not only on symptom management but also on improving overall function and promoting a healthy lifestyle. By addressing muscle weakness, improving flexibility, correcting posture, and providing education and support, physiotherapy can significantly enhance the well-being and quality of life for individuals living with this condition.

If you or someone you know is struggling with lumbar spinal stenosis, it is essential to consult a qualified physiotherapist. They will assess your specific condition, develop a personalized treatment plan, and guide you through exercises and techniques that will help manage your symptoms effectively. Remember, with the right support and therapeutic interventions, you can regain control over your life and find relief from the challenges posed by lumbar spinal stenosis.

Contact us today if you need help with your lower back injury.

calf pain when running

Calf pain when running

Calf pain when running 960 576 Ace Health Centre

Calf pain when running

Understanding and Overcoming Calf Pain When Running: Tips and Techniques

Calf pain when running can be a common issue faced by runners of all levels. It can significantly hamper your performance and enjoyment of the sport. In this blog post, we will delve into the causes of calf pain, discuss prevention strategies, and provide effective techniques to alleviate discomfort and get you back on track.

  1. Understanding the Causes: Calf pain during running can stem from various factors, including muscle strains, overuse, improper footwear, inadequate warm-up, and biomechanical imbalances. Identifying the root cause is crucial for implementing the right treatment and prevention methods.
  2. Prevention Strategies: Preventing calf pain starts with a solid foundation. Invest in proper running shoes that offer ample support and cushioning. Gradually increase your training intensity and duration to allow your calf muscles to adapt. Incorporate dynamic stretches and warm-ups to prepare your muscles for activity. Strengthening exercises targeting the calf muscles, such as heel raises and toe raises, can also help prevent pain and injuries.
  3. Effective Techniques to Alleviate Calf Pain: When calf pain strikes, it’s essential to take prompt action to minimize discomfort and aid recovery. Resting and applying ice to the affected area can reduce inflammation. Gentle stretching exercises, like calf, stretches against a wall or using a foam roller can help relieve tension. Consider using compression sleeves or socks to improve blood flow and provide support during runs. If the pain persists, consult a healthcare professional or a sports therapist for a comprehensive evaluation and personalized treatment plan.
  4. Gradual Return to Running: After recovering from calf pain, it’s crucial to reintroduce running gradually. Start with shorter distances and lower intensities, allowing your calf muscles to rebuild strength and endurance. Listen to your body and increase the duration and intensity of your runs gradually over time. Incorporating cross-training activities like swimming or cycling can also help maintain fitness while reducing strain on your calves.

Conclusion

Calf pain when running can be a frustrating setback, but with the right strategies, it’s possible to overcome it. By understanding the causes and implementing prevention techniques, you can get back to pain-free running.

Remember to consult a healthcare professional if your calf pain persists or worsens, as they can provide expert advice tailored to your specific condition. Stay consistent with your prevention strategies, listen to your body, and enjoy the benefits of running without calf pain.

 

Lumbar Range of Motion 

Lumbar Range of Motion 

Lumbar Range of Motion  1200 600 Ace Health Centre

Lumbar Range of Motion

While some patients might be in a lot of pain and hesitant to move their back, having a patient move to assess the Lumbar Range of Motion is crucial to a physiotherapist. Normal amounts are –

  • Flexion (73-40 degrees) declines noted with age.
  • Lateral flexion (28-14 degrees, L&R) declined with age.
  • The extension (29-6 degrees) declined the greatest at 79% with age.
  • No decline in axial rotational (7%) way across the age spectrum.

The range of motion for the lumbar spine should be symmetrical on either side. When examining a patient’s lumbar range of motion we are not just checking if they have adequate motion, but also to make sure that range is symmetrical. A person’s range will also be dependent of the activities that they partake in. For example, somebody who just does general walking will need less range than a person who plays tennis. Therefore each patient should be assessed as an individual and not just what the textbook says is normal.

What does it Involve?

Firstly, a physiotherapist will take a good history. When diagnosing an injury, taking a complete history is one of the most important parts. Information is taken regarding their pain, pain patterns, mechanism of injury

if it has occurred in the past and if it has, what helped them, what helps to decrease the pain and what makes it worse.

The physio will then move on to the assessment. Your spine is made to move, therefore the therapist will ask the patient to bend and flex into certain key positions. They will be looking at how much movement is available in each spinal joint. They will look at what compensations you may have if one area is not moving as it should. Lastly and most importantly, how the patient feels throughout. This includes when they get pain, how much pain, and the type of pain.

Why a Lumbar Range of Motion needs to be done?

Knowing the type of pain and where the pain is throughout the assessment allows the physiotherapist to determine potential sources or causes of the patient’s pain. From just listening to what the patient says and observing how they move they can differentiate whether the injury is likely disc, bone, joint, neural or muscular in nature.

What next?

Once the history has been taken, and the range of motion assessment is complete, your physio will then develop a diagnosis and a treatment plan. This may include anything from massage, needling, shockwave, exercise, scans and more.

If you have a spine injury contact us today to book in with one of our physios.

Blog is written by our physio Lachlan.

ACE Custom made Insoles. 3d orthotics

Custom Orthotic Instructions

Custom Orthotic Instructions 1000 667 Ace Health Centre

Custom Orthotic Instructions

 

Welcome to your new custom orthotics

Thank you for purchasing your new custom orthotics from Ace Health Centre. Here’s your custom orthotic instruction with all of the information you will need about them. It details how your custom orthotics are prescribed, designed, manufactured, and what to expect.

Did you know it takes your podiatrist over an hour of extra work after your consult to finish your orthotics?

How your orthotics are prescribed

Your orthotics are prescribed from a mix of –

  • your injury
  • your flexibility
  • your posture
  • your alignment in your feet, knees hips and back
  • your weight
  • your shoes
  • your sport or activity
  • your medical history such as being diabetic
  • your blood flow to your feet
  • your nerves and feeling in your feet
  • your balance
  • history of other injuries
  • muscle strength
  • corns or callous
  • and more…

Orthotics prescription and design

When prescribing orthotics there are many different things that a podiatrist can do design-wise. The prescription itself will be determined from the assessment.

Your podiatrist will then have done a 3D scan of your feet. The 3D scan provides a base model of your feet giving them your base arch heights, foot length and widths.

The custom orthotics are then designed via computer software by your podiatrist after the consult. It takes a lot of time and practice to be able to use CAD cam software to design an orthotic. You need to know how the CAD cam design will end up after being 3D printed. The software helps aid with the consistency of the orthotics. It is far more accurate and repeatable than other methods of orthotic manufacture.

Every podiatrist will prescribe slightly different meaning you could go to 10 different podiatrists and get 10 different orthotics designs and prescriptions. The goal though will always be the same. The main difference is that many podiatrists get other companies to do computer design for them. At Ace, we do all of the computer design ourselves.

Did you know Mike, our podiatrist does design work for other podiatry clinics around Australia as well in his spare time?

3D printing

Once your orthotics have been designed by computer the file is sent to a 3D printer. The 3D printer is an industrial-size printer that prints around 30-50 sets of orthotics in one go. It cannot just print singles. It prints by laying down layers of very fine powder in microns and then heats the powder to fuse it in specific places. The printing process takes around 24-36 hours in total. The orthotics are then removed from the printer, sandblasted to remove any excess powder, and then washed. The orthotics are printed using an HP MJF 4200 using PA11 nylon material. This material is also eco-friendly and 3D printing minimises waste material.

Covering

Once the 3D-printed shell arrives at the clinic, it’s time to cover the orthotics. This is all done via your podiatrist by hand. The covers that your orthotics will be decided by your podiatrist from your consultation. This is determined by factors such as – your activity, the shoes you will wear them in, your weight, your medical history, your injury and more. There are many different materials available. Covers on orthotics can be replaced if you ever want to give your orthotics a little TLC.

Fitting

Once the orthotics have been completed, our reception team will give you a call to arrange a fitting appointment. Your orthotics are always made slightly big for your shoes and require trimming up to ensure a good fit.

It’s important to remember that your orthotics are only as good as the shoes they are being put into. This means that although putting them into flat soft or flexible shoes will be much better than nothing at all, fitting them into a good supportive stable shoe will give much better results. Your podiatrist should have discussed footwear with you in the consult and possibly given you recommendations for shoes that your custom orthotics will work best in.

If you do require new shoes we recommend purchasing them before your fitting appointment. This way your podiatrist can check the fitting of the shoes, make sure the shoe is correct, and fit the orthotics into the shoes.

How to fit your shoes – When fitting an enclosed lace-up shoe we usually recommend fitting them by – putting both shoes on, lacing the shoes up properly, standing up, and having a finger’s width between the end of your longest toe and the end of the shoe. We also suggest being able to pinch a small amount of fabric across the widest part of your forefoot. This ensures that the orthotics will fit the shoes, and will provide a more comfortable experience. It is always best to go shoe shopping at the end of the day when your feet are maximally swollen and expanded. This will give you a much better idea of fit and comfort.

For people who spend a lot of time on their feet, it is sometimes beneficial to purchase 2 pairs of shoes and alternate them daily. The foam in the soles of shoes can take 24 – 48 hours to fully recover and expand back out. This means that having that rest day helps them last longer, maintaining more support and cushioning.

Shoes do have a lifespan. If you are in your shoes for 8 hours per day we recommend getting new shoes every 6-8 months. Just because the top looks ok doesn’t mean the foam is. We also recommended replacing shoes after having them for 1.5 years as the foam and glues in the shoes start to degrade. This means the shoes will not provide the same support and cushion as they once did when new.

Your orthotics may not fit every shoe but may be able to fit between shoes that are the same size. Just take out the original insole that is in your shoe and replace it with your custom orthotics.

What to expect

Everybody is very different in the way their body reacts to orthotics. The orthotics are often designed to hold/guide your feet in a certain position. This means that different muscles will be used while wearing them. These muscles can take time to adjust. For that reason, we ask you to pay attention to your body. Aches or pains for up to the first 4 weeks are normal. If you experience this we suggest taking the orthotics out, putting the original insoles from the shoes back in, and then starting to use the orthotics again the next day.

Reviews

After the fitting appointment, we book you for a 3-4 week orthotic review. This review session is to see how you are getting on with them. Making sure you are happy, they are comfortable, and they are doing their job. If there are any issues at this stage the orthotics can be modified when needed. Things such as arch heights, cushioning, support, flexibility and more can be changed. Just like anything custom it can be changed and modified as needed. For the first 3 months reviews are done without any out-of-pocket cost.

If you are experiencing issues where you are not able to wear your custom orthotics due to pain we recommend calling up for a review appointment and coming in sooner.

We recommend having your orthotics reviewed every 12 months. This is due to changes within your body that may affect your orthotics prescription. This can be anything from strength, flexibility sensation, blood flow and more. You may also have a new injury or issues that the orthotic needs to be aimed at that may require a change in prescription again. Your orthotic shell may also become more flexible over time meaning it will provide less support. These changes may mean an update in your orthotics prescription.

If you need anything or have any questions please contact us here, or book here. 

Please note that we do have a strict 24-hour cancellation policy. if an appointment is missed, or cancelled within the 24 hours before the consult then a full consult fee will apply. This also applies to any collection or review appointments as well. 

Warranty – Al orthotic shells (plastic parts) have a 12-month warranty for breakage. Top covers have a 3-month warranty.

 

online exercise prescription

Online exercise prescription

Online exercise prescription 1920 1009 Ace Health Centre

Online exercise prescription

One of the biggest factors to consider regarding patient rehabilitation and positive outcomes is exercise adherence. Patients no matter the condition are likely to get some form of home exercise program to continue progressing at home. It is reported as high as 50% of patients do not complete their exercise prescribed by the therapist thus limiting their rehabilitation. Often barriers to exercise adherence include lack to time, lack of understanding of exercises, forgetting how to complete the exercise or the prescription regarding sets and repetitions.

So what do we do to combat this?

We use an application called Physitrack for our online exercise prescription. Physitrack allows clinicians to prescribe individualised home exercise programs. Physitrack has multiple user-friendly features including demonstration videos with audible cues for the exercise, allowing the therapist to easily alter the repetitions, sets and resistance for each activity as well as a section for the clinician to add any specific notes for cues they want their patient to remember.

During the consult, we sit down with our clients and educate them on how to download pysitrack and view their program. We also print out the program for our patients which documents, the exercises, exercise explanations, the repetitions and more. We can also put individual notes from the physio to make sure you have everything written down and easy to understand. All these features make exercise adherence easier for the patient thus helping the patient stay on track for a speedy recovery.

Our podiatrist also uses this programme in order to give his exercise programmes. Each clinician can log in and view each person’s programme making it easier to work between practitioners and modalities. This communication between practitioners leads to much better client care.

Online consults

The use of this application also means that we can do online telehealth consultations. Over the phone, we can simply email your exercise programme to you, and know that you will have all the details you need to perform it correctly.

Book now to see our physio

What is Whiplash

What is Whiplash?

What is Whiplash? 840 438 Ace Health Centre

What is Whiplash

So, What is Whiplash? Whiplash is an acceleration-deceleration event that results in increased forces directed to the neck, usually from a motor vehicle collision. The impact from the accident may result in various injuries that could present in many different ways. Some symptoms you may experience if you are involved in a car accident include:
  • Neck Pain
  • Shoulder/Arm/Hand/Back pain
  • Pins, needles, or numbness down your arm
  • Sensitivity to touch
  • Decreased neck movement
  • Headaches
Although not as common, other symptoms could include:
  • Vision problems
  • Trouble with your hearing
  • Dizziness
  • Memory/Concentration problems
  • Jaw pain
  • Sleeping difficulty
  • Fatigue
  • Emotional changes

Whiplash Myths

Over the years, there have been mixed sayings on whether or not certain factors relate to recovery success. For example, awareness of the collision has been said to increase your whiplash symptoms. This is actually NOT true. Other myths that do NOT relate to how well you recover include:

  • Shoulder pain
  • Speed of collision
  • Age
  • Marital status
  • Seat belt use
  • Shoulder pain
  • Position in vehicle

How do I treat whiplash?

A motor vehicle accident can be a very scary and potentially traumatic event. It is important to seek both physical and psychological aid for coping and relief strategies. This will ensure you make a full and speedy recovery. Most do make a full recovery after their accident, however, the timeframe of recovery can greatly vary. Seeking treatment and support from your physiotherapist can help facilitate a quicker recovery. Treatment strategies can range from various neck movements to breathing exercises. Seeking assistance as soon as possible after your accident helps ensure your symptoms can be promptly addressed and taken care of.
Book in today for your assessment and realise that whiplash can be treated. Book Now. 
frozen shoulder

Frozen Shoulder

Frozen Shoulder 632 335 Ace Health Centre

The Frozen Shoulder

Adhesive capsulitis (aka frozen shoulder, painful stiff shoulder or periarthritis) is a self-limiting condition where the bones, tendons or ligaments cause pain on movement. Frozen shoulder later progresses too restricted active AND passive glenohumeral ROM. There is disagreement whether it stems from an inflammatory, fibrosing or algoneurodystrophic (a form of complex regional pain syndrome without demonstrable nerve lesions) conditions.
Frozen shoulder can affect the antero-superior joint capsule, axillary recess and the coracohumeral ligament. Common findings may include a small joint with loss of axillary fold, tight anterior capsule, and synovitis but no adhesions. The space surrounding the GHJ has been suspected to reduce from 15-35 cubic centimetres to 5-6cm.

Ethology of frozen shoulder

Frozen shoulder is classified as either primary (idiopathic onset) or secondary (a direct cause). Secondary onsets could include:
  • systemic (diabetes/metabolic conditions/hypothyroidism)
  • extrinsic (CVA, Parkinson’s, direct trauma)
  • intrinsic (rotator cuff/other shoulder muscle pathologies) factors of origin
It is also known as the 50 year old shoulder since it is much more prevalent in this age group. It is especially common in females over the age of 40 and those who are recovering from a mastectomy are at greater risk.
Frozen shoulder can be challenging to differentiate in the early stages from other shoulder pathologies. One of the main presenting factors is loss of external rotation. Restrictions in a capsular pattern present as ER limitations > Abd limitations > IR limitations. Patients may also complain of difficulties with dressing, overhead activities, grooming. Symptoms may also worsen at night.
The time frame for recovery varies greatly from 6 months to 11 years which could be spontaneous complete recovery or nearly-complete. Most tend to resolve around 3 years. Unfortunately, some patients’ symptoms may never fully resolve (estimated to be around 15%).

The three overlapping phases include:

1. Acute/freezing/painful phase: sharp pain with sleep interruptions – 2-9months
2. Adhesive/frozen/stiffening phase: pain decreases lingering at end ROM, ROM decreases in a capsular pattern – 4-12months
3. Resolution/thawing phase: spontaneous improvement in ROM – 5-24months Physical exam is usually sufficient to diagnose frozen shoulder, however X-rays, US or MRI can help rule out other issues.
A definitive treatment for frozen shoulder remains unclear, however, daily HEP along with an exercise therapy program and patient education are key to aid in the patient’s rehabilitation. It is key to manage your patient’s expectations to allow for a successful recovery. PNF has been found to be effective at decreasing pain and increasing ROM/function. MWMs may be helpful and superior than stretching alone during the second stiffening phase.
During the third phase of frozen shoulder rehab , strengthening should be increased with stretching being increased in frequency and duration but at the same intensity. The strongest evidence supports manual therapy and exercise in adjunct to corticosteroid injection.
For the ultimate frozen shoulder rehab contact us today.